To Best Fight Cancer, New Guidelines Urge Exercise


November 8, 2010

November 8, 2010
HealthDay News

"To Best Fight Cancer, New Guidelines Urge Exercise"

Kathryn Schmitz, PhD, MPH,
an associate professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and a member of the Abramson Cancer Center, is quoted in a HealthDay News story about new exercise guidelines for cancer patients. Schmitz led a panel that created the guidelines, based on research showing that exercise is not only safe for cancer patients, but may also improve outcomes. "Evidence is promising that exercise may make cancer treatment more effective," says Schmitz. For example, breast cancer patients doing resistance training were better able to take a full dose of chemotherapy, rather than having to cut the treatment short due to the detrimental effects of chemo on the body, she said.  READ MORE

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October 10, 2010
Columbia Daily Tribune

'Exercise as medicine' movement gains traction

Once relegated to health clubs, exercise is muscling into its way into a wide variety of disease prevention and treatment plans. Physical fitness programs are already a staple of cardiac care...

“There’s still a prevailing attitude out there that patients shouldn’t push themselves during treatment,” said Kathryn Schmitz, an associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and lead author of the new guidelines... Read More

Additional Coverage

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September 30, 2010
Oncology Times


New Exercise Guidelines for Cancer Patients

The Oncology Times covered the exercise guidelines for cancer patients that were recently released by an American College of Sports Medicine panel led by Kathryn Schmitz, PhD, MPH, an associate professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology and a member of the Abramson Cancer Center. The authors urge patients to avoid inactivity, since it can help patients overcome fatigue and improve strength, quality of life and body image... Read More

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August 2, 2010

Weightlifting Professor Attests to Health Benefits

Kathryn Schmitz, PhD, MPH,
associate professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology was featured in Art Carey's "Well Being" column in the Philadelphia Inquirer Health & Science Section. Schmitz, who has performed research showing the positive impact of weightlifting on cancer survivors, was pictured and portrayed as an advocate for physical exertion with resistance exercise, or weightlifting, at its core. Read More
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July 23, 2010

Oncology Times

Benefits & Safety of Exercise Showcased At Cancer Survivors' Conference

"Cancer survivors are at high risk for recurrence and second cancers, so anything that can be done to reduce that risk and help build strength and health should survivors need additional cancer treatment is important," says Kathryn H. Schmitz, PhD, MPH, associate professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology and Abramson Cancer Center member. In continued coverage, Schmitz was featured in an Oncology Times for her participation in the recent Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, LIVESTRONG, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Reporters covered Schmitz describing the Physical Activity and Lymphedema (PAL) trial, a supervised upper body exercise intervention among 295 breast cancer survivors with and without lymphedema at YMCAs with specially trained YMCA instructors.Women in this twice-weekly program must have a written physician clearance. "There appears to be tremendous interest in sustaining and growing this program," says Schmitz, who adds, "We cut the number of lymphedema flare-ups in half." Schmitz admits there are no challenges with the program, including developing trust with the oncology community and coping with the high staff turnover at YMCAs. But, she says, in addition to the health benefits, the cost-saving payoffs for such a program could be large, because "survivors with lymphedema have double the costs of survivors without lymphedema." Read More

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June 1, 2010
WHYY


A University of Pennsylvania researcher says exercise should play a bigger role in cancer treatment, and she's urging oncologists to update their advice to patients.

For people who've had a heart attack or stroke, keeping fit is often part of the road to recovery. Many patients get an exercise prescription along with their initial surgery and treatment.

That's not done as often in cases of cancer.

But an expert panel convened by the American College of Sports Medicine reviewed the evidence on exercise for cancer patients and found overwhelming benefits.

Kathryn Schmitz, with Penn's Abramson Cancer Center, led the review... Read More

Resource Guide for Cancer Survivors Interested in Exercise [PDF]

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