Penn Research Shows Nicotine Patch Works Better When Used Longer


February 2, 2010

Penn Medicine News Release

Caryn Lerman, PhD, a Mary W. Calkins Professor of Psychiatry and Deputy Director of the Abramson Cancer Center, and Robert Schnoll, PhD, an associate professor of Psychiatry, are quoted in several news stories about their new Annals of Internal Medicine study showing that smokers who wore a nicotine patch for 24 weeks instead of the standard 8 weeks recommended for the therapy had more success trying to kick the habit and were less likely to  relapse into smoking after small smoking slip-ups. The study was covered by Reuters, BusinessWeek (via Bloomberg News) and Health magazine's web site. "This suggests that we may need to reconsider our guidelines about the length of treatment and consider, at least for some smokers, longer-term therapy," Lerman told Reuters. Although it's not yet known what long-term effect keeping people in the nicotine patch would have, Schnoll says, "nicotine replacement therapy is definitely safer than tobacco use."

Penn Medicine News Release

Additional Coverage
Reuters article
Bloomberg News
Health
MSN
ScienceDaily
The Daily Pennsylvanian