Multiple Myeloma


Multiple myeloma is a type of cancer that begins in plasma cells (white blood cells that produce antibodies). Also called Kahler disease, myelomatosis, and plasma cell myeloma.

Different treatments are available for those with multiple myeloma. Some treatments are called standard. This means they are the currently used treatments. Some treatments are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments.

When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment, while others are available during or after treatment.

Treatment options vary depending on your situation including the stage of the cancer and other factors that may be... read more Treatment

Survivor Stories

Brian Trainor

It was on January 7th that Penn law student Brian Trainor, a healthy and active 31 year old with no known symptoms had a sudden seizure. Brian was rushed to HUP, where he received a CT scan and MRI, which uncovered a 2.5 centimeter tumor on the left frontal lobe of his brain.




Spotlight

Stand Up to Cancer

Peter O'Dwyer, MD, professor of Hematology-Oncology and program director of Development Therapeutics in the Abramson Cancer Center, was interviewed on NBC10's 10! Show about Penn's work as part of the Stand Up to Cancer Dream Team... Read more

Multiple Myeloma Trials

High Dose Granulocyte Transfusions for the Treatment of Infection in Neutropenia: The RING Study... more