Clinical Trials



High Dose Granulocyte Transfusions for the Treatment of Infection in Neutropenia: The RING Study (Resolving Infection in Neutropenia With Granulocytes)

Title:



High Dose Granulocyte Transfusions for the Treatment of Infection in Neutropenia: The RING Study (Resolving Infection in Neutropenia With Granulocytes)

Phase:



III

Thousands of people each year are hospitalized for neutropenia, which continues to cause substantial morbidity and mortality for those affected. Neutropenia is primarily caused by chemotherapy and various other cancer treatments, such as radiation therapy, biotherapy, and HSC transplantation. Signs and symptoms of neutropenia may include high fever, chills, sore throat, and diarrhea. In neutropenia, the number of neutrophils, a type of granulocyte, is greatly reduced, weakening the body's immune system and increasing the risk of infection. Therefore, a method to provide adequate numbers of functional granulocytes to people with neutropenia could be of greatest benefit for recovery. Administration of a combination of two drugs, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone, has been show to stimulate the body to produce a large number of granulocytes. Granulocyte transfusions obtained from donors who have received these two drugs may help people with low white blood cell counts fight infections until their own white blood cell counts recover. However, it is not clear whether the benefits of granulocyte transfusions outweigh the risks of side effects. This study will compare the safety and effectiveness of granulocyte transfusions with standard antimicrobial therapy versus the safety and effectiveness of standard antimicrobial therapy alone in increasing granulocyte numbers and in improving survival rates in people with bacterial or fungal infection during neutropenia.

Neutropenia, a condition characterized by an abnormally low number of infection-fighting white blood cells called neutrophils, commonly develops in people who have undergone chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. The severely reduced immunity of those with neutropenia can put them at risk for entry of life-threatening infections, making the implementation of treatments that increase white blood cell numbers important. Several studies have shown that the transfusion of donor granulocytes, a type of white blood cell that includes neutrophils, is effective in promoting the recovery of adequate numbers of granulocytes. However, granulocyte transfusions can cause side effects, and it is not known whether the success of the therapy outweighs the health risks of the side effects. This study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of granulocyte transfusions in treating people with a bacterial or fungal infection during neutropenia.


To see if you are eligible for this trial, use the Cancer Center's Clinical Trials Matching Service, which is on OncoLink, the Cancer Center's information resource on the web.