Bone Marrow Transplant and Stem Cell Transplant Program


Abramson Cancer Center bone marrow and stem cell transplant clinicians and researchers have led the way nationally for years; both in the care of patients undergoing transplant and in its research.

Today, there's more hope than ever for those who face a cancer diagnosis in which bone marrow or stem cell transplant is a treatment option.

Penn's program is one of the oldest and largest in the country. By putting our experience to work, we offer the best possible treatment outcomes.

Bone Marrow Transplant is a procedure to replace bone marrow that has been destroyed by treatment with high doses of anticancer drugs or radiation.

Transplantation may be autologous (an individual's own marrow saved before treatment), allogeneic (marrow donated by someone else), or syngeneic (marrow donated by an identical twin).

Stem Cell Transplant is a method of replacing immature blood-forming cells that were destroyed by cancer treatment. The stem cells are given to the person after cancer treatment to help the bone marrow recover and continue producing healthy blood cells.

If bone marrow or stem cell transplant is a treatment option for you, it's important to have the best team of experts available.

At Penn's Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplant Program you'll find individuals nationally recognized for their expertise. They can provide the information, care and support to help you each step of the way.

Penn has one of the few Hematologic Malignancy (leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma) Research Programs in the country that is approved and funded by the National Cancer Institute. It is through this research program that Penn has made significant advances in improving bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

The knowledge gained through our research allows us to better care for those undergoing bone marrow/stem cell transplant.

To learn about what sets us apart, visit:

Survivor Stories

Sallie Nangeroni

In 2003 her doctors found a cancerous brain tumor, estimating that she had a year and a half to live. Sallie Nangeroni wanted the best neurosurgeon in the region. She came to HUP. Sally was rightfully scared. Her father died of brain cancer when he was just 40 years old, and her husband's brother had just passed away from a brain tumor. At the time she was diagnosed, Sallie just hoped that she would be able to see all three of her sons graduate from high school. Now, 7 years later, she has seen two of them graduate from college, with one now in medical school. Her next goal is to see her youngest son graduate from college next year.




Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are studies to find new ways to prevent, detect and treat cancer. The purpose of each clinical trial is to answer a specific question. Our physicians carefully design these studies to find new ways to improve care and quality of life ... more about clinical trials